Nescience

The following is part of a comment, a good one among a dozen other good ones, on Edward Curtin’s latest essay, HERE. — MCM

“A speaker … mentioned that we often use the word ignorance where another word, nescience, would be more descriptive. It is possible to be unaware of information because we have not been exposed to it. It is also possible to be exposed to information and to ignore it, which is real ignorance — much in evidence these days. But nescience means that we don’t know something because we have not had the information available to us.”

Non-9/11 Physics

A Facebook friend sent the following message regarding a May 27 article in physics.aps.org:

“We interrupt our regular garden photos for the following message: A stability analysis of the ice sheet covering a large area of Greenland suggests that the ice melting may be approaching a point of no return.

https://physics.aps.org/articles/v41/80

“The Greenland ice sheet—an important component of Earth’s climate system—is losing mass at an accelerating rate. A great concern is that the ice sheet could be headed toward a tipping point, beyond which the ice cap would be permanently lost. A new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, suggests that a large part of Greenland’s ice sheet may be close to such a tipping point. The complete melting of Greenland’s ice cap could lead to a sea-level rise of up to 7m and may trigger a cascade of other climate instabilities …

“The researchers acknowledge that more research is needed to firmly establish whether a tipping point has already been reached or whether it might be close. In particular, other feedback mechanisms need to be considered, including both destabilizing effects—notably the decrease of albedo due to ice-cover loss—and stabilizing effects—such as the increase of snowfall due to warming temperatures.”

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I’ll try to get permission to identify the friend by name and background.

What does the article recommended have to do with 9/11 truth? Everything does.

— Mark Channing Miller

Memorial Day

The Lawyers’ Committee for 9/11 Inquiry today sent the message below and this video of two service members playing Taps at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia, one in the summer and one in the winter.

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Dear Friends,

The Lawyers’ Committee for 9/11 Inquiry Board of Directors would like to wish you and your family a a safe and healthy Memorial Day.

We give honor and thanks to the millions of courageous and patriotic American men and women who have risked their lives to protect our freedoms.

David R. Meiswinkle, Esq.
President/Executive Director
Lawyers’ Committee for 9/11 Inquiry

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An Army veteran and former police officer in New Jersey, Meiswinkle is a criminal defense attorney. He and Atty. Mick Harrison, litigation director, are the organization’s principal lawyers.

Since 2002 the Lawyers’ Committee has conducted investigations, legal actions and public education related to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and the circumstances leading up to and following those events. Its focus is on government accountability regarding investigation and prosecution of those responsible for federal crimes related to the attacks.

Most prominently, although in the near total absence of news media coverage, the Committee has (1) petitioned the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York to present to a Special Grand Jury information submitted by citizens regarding the commission of federal crimes related to the 9/11 attacks, and (2) taken legal action against the FBI in U.S. District Court in Washington, DC, to compel the Bureau to access and report evidence of the explosive demolition of three World Trade Center skyscrapers (the Twin Towers and Building 7) as well as other unaddressed evidence related to the attacks. Both of these actions have required follow-up attention.

Additionally, last October, it formally petitioned Congress to initiate a Congressional investigation of the September 2001 anthrax attacks.

More Sorensen

Parts 2 and 3 of Christian Sorensen’s “A People’s Guide to the War Industry” are HERE and HERE. Part 1 is available HERE. All three are presented by Consortium News.

Part 2 is subtitled “Profits & Deception.” Part 3 is subtitled “Bribery & Propaganda.” (Click on them to read.)

I sent these two comments about Part 2 (quoted sentences from the article are in italics):

“I have a question concerning this paragraph: ‘The ruling class profits by underpaying the workers. A given worker on a given day produces value, which we’ll call A, B, C, D, E, F, and G. The corporation pays the worker a wage comparable to F and G. The rest (A, B, C, D, E) is “surplus value.” This difference between what a worker is paid in wages and the value a worker creates is how the corporation profits.

“Doesn’t it leave out all sorts of other expenses of the corporation, including property taxes, costs of materials including energy, corporate income taxes, and insurance? … There must be others. Possibly, these would fall under H, I, J, K, etc. If so, shouldn’t you say so?”

“A few paragraphs later: ‘We can harness the human mind in many ways. Nonetheless, so far — by the numbers — the U.S. government has only spent significant monies on military and war. Try throwing that kind of money at the sciences and arts every year — via other federal departments, such as Interior, Agriculture, Health & Human Services, Transportation — and see where unpressured, non-militarized research and development lead.

“Comment: It would help to see a pie chart or other simple graphic to put the military and war spending in context.”

I wouldn’t bother with my own comments on the second installment except that by the time I got them in, the comments window was closed.

A question on the second installment I didn’t think to ask was: roughly what percentage of the workforce in this industry is unionized, and by what international unions, and if the author thinks workforce unionization would tend to make union members averse to anti-war efforts.

The third installment, of five, is the shortest by far and seems to confine itself to vividly describing subject matter of some political science and media studies courses. In that installment one of the accompanying photos shows usually invisible National Public Radio personnel in a studio of NPR’s Washington headquarters.

— Mark Channing Miller

Notes, 5-27-21

“Morning Edition” on NPR today featured two stories of interest to truthers, including those seeking 9/11 truths:

In one, Brooklyn, N.Y., rabbi Miriam Grossman talks, HERE, about why she no longer considers herself a Zionist. Compare the seven-minute segment with this article in today’s New York Times, headlined “Anti-Semitism Surges in Wake of Gaza Clash,” in which Zionism is not mentioned.

In the other, the biographer Ken Ellingwood talks, HERE, about the life and death of the abolitionist Elijah Lovejoy (1802-1837). Ellingwood’s book is titled First to Fall: Elijah Lovejoy and the Fight for a Free Press in the Age of Slavery.

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Columnist Dalton Delan offers a backhanded and somewhat abstruse salute to the now-octogenarian Bob Dylan. It is HERE for subscribers to the Berkshire Eagle, which headlined it “Still don’t need a weatherman” on op-ed.

Delan, winner of Emmy, Peabody and DuPont-Columbia awards for his work as a television producer, calls Dylan “a precocious talent but also a prevaricator by trade and not all sweetness and light, as Joan Baez learned right on camera.” These days, he writes, “the Bard of Hibbing [is] still on the road, the darkest part, croaking rather than what passed for singing.”

— Mark Channing Miller

Prestidigitations

Edward Curtin scooped The Times. His “Bob Dylan at Eighty: A Masked Man in Search of Redemption” yesterday (online HERE) sought to figure out the elusive man whose oeuvre is not over.

Today for the Times in ink on newsprint, Jason Zinoman’s “Dylan Is Also a Master Jester” (online HERE), while readable and containing truths, marginalizes the man by slicing parts of his creative career for a  conformist sandwich. Certain things are not ready for prime time. Not yet fit to print.

Curtin adapts a chapter of his 2020 book, Seeking Truth In a Country of Lies, continuing to see Dylan as someone in and out of hiding as he sees fit.

That is not an option for Zinoman, a jester himself. For him, here at least, Dylan is a pop star with a sense of humor. He deserves a place “in the pantheon of great Jewish funny men.” “But the first prank Dylan pulled was posing as a plain-spoken truth-teller.” A photo caption reads, “His lyrics could be silly or goofy.”

A year ago, Jeff Morley foresaw Zimoman’s plight. In “The New York Times Evades Dylan’s JFK Challenge,” he critiques an interview in the newspaper between historian Douglas Brinkley and the man who had just released “Murder Most Foul.” (Read Morley — and commentators — and listen to the song HERE.)

As befits a custodian of the website jfkfacts.org, Morley is not evasive. Just the opposite.

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Find another “Happy Birthday” to Bob Dylan HERE. It’s by James Howard Kunstler of “The End of Suburbia” and The Long Emergency fame, more recently all-purpose arch-critic of President Biden. I’m happy I didn’t come across it until sending in the parts above the dashes. It’s no less true than they are, just less in keeping with the main purposes of this blog.

— Mark Channing Miller

 

 

Notes, 5-24-21

Christopher Sorensen writes authoritatively in “A People’s Guide to the War Industry” on what he calls the military industrial congressional complex. It is the first of five articles by him to be relayed by Consortium News. Sorensen’s book Understanding the War Industry was published last year by Clarity Press.

   

Catherine Austin Fitts speaks authoritatively about possible connections between the Covid virus, central banks and “a complete digital control system” (including mind control) worldwide. The 48-minute interview is titled “Mr. Global’s Bid for Economic Totalitarianism and Transhumanism — IF We Allow It.” Portions are transcribed in the link. Parts have been exempted for the film “Planet Lockdown.”

   

The second item above was linked by Edward Curtin in his essay “Second Stage Terror Wars,” mentioned in this blog last Friday (“What’s Going On?”).

— Mark Channing Miller

Choose Love

I’m sometimes asked about this or that entry, “What does that have to do with 9/11?” Well, a lot does when so much of what goes on in the world is based on unchallenged lies. Today, without their permission, I’m turning everything below over to the Center for Action and Contemplation. Click on any of the links for more. — MCM

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Choosing Love in a Time of Evil

May 16 – May 21, 2021

Sunday
The people who hold the contradictions and resolve them in themselves are the saviors of the world. They are the only real agents of transformation, reconciliation, and newness. — Richard Rohr

Monday
While evil may reside primarily in “corporate” form, the resistance to it begins with individuals who make a clear decision to fight evil and hatred with goodness and love, even at the risk of their lives. — Richard Rohr

Tuesday
Oh, Lord, let me feel at one with myself. Let me perform a thousand daily tasks with love, but let every one spring from a greater central core of devotion and love. — Etty Hillesum

Wednesday
Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom. — Viktor Frankl

Thursday
The choice to accept myself as I am: human, imperfect. To be useful, to be used up, to survive and to thrive so I can use every moment to make the world a better place— Edith Eger

Friday
In the gospel we are shown that real power is not the power of domination but rather the power of love. And that looking at life from the vantage point of love, we see our being and our joy increase to an extent that we give it away. — Adam Bucko

One of the primary themes of the Hebrew Scriptures is that of liberation. God frees the Jewish people from enslavement, exile, and suffering. In the Christian Scriptures, Jesus continues to do that work through his Gospel of love and forgiveness. Perhaps it’s not very surprising, then, that the therapeutic model Dr. Edith Eger developed over her four decades of practice is based on freedom. She calls it “Choice Therapy, as freedom is about CHOICE—about choosing compassion, humor, optimism, intuition, curiosity, and self-expression.” [1] In this practice, drawn from her Jewish faith and tradition, she encourages us to find freedom through conscious choice. — Richard Rohr

In the Haggadah, the Jewish text that tells the story of liberation from slavery in Egypt and teaches the prayers and rituals for seder, the special Passover feast, there are four questions that the youngest member of the family traditionally gets to ask—the questions it was my privilege to ask at my childhood seders, that I asked the last night I spent with my parents in our home. In my therapeutic practice I have my own version of the four questions . . . [so patients] could liberate themselves from their victimhood.

  1. What do you want? This is a deceptively simple question. It can be much more difficult than we realize to give ourselves permission to know and listen to ourselves, to align ourselves with our desires. How often when we answer this question do we say what we want for someone else? . . .
  2. Who wants it? This is our charge and our struggle: to understand our own expectations for ourselves versus trying to live up to others’ expectations of us. . . . It’s our responsibility to act in service of our authentic selves. Sometimes this means giving up the need to please others, giving up our need for others’ approval.
  3. What are you going to do about it? I believe in the power of positive thinking—but change and freedom also require positive action. Anything we practice, we become better at. If we practice anger, we’ll have more anger. If we practice fear, we’ll have more fear. In many cases, we actually work very hard to ensure that we go nowhere. Change is about noticing what’s no longer working and stepping out of the familiar, imprisoning patterns.
  4. When? In Gone with the Wind, my mother’s favorite book, Scarlett O’Hara, when confronted with a difficulty, says, “I’ll think about it tomorrow. . . . After all, tomorrow is another day.” If we are to evolve instead of revolve, it’s time to take action now. . . .

I’ve never met a person who would consciously choose to live in captivity. Yet I’ve witnessed again and again how willingly we hand over our spiritual and mental freedom, choosing to give another person or entity the responsibility of guiding our lives, of choosing for us — Dr. Edith Eger

What’s Going On?

Justice is what love looks like in public. — Cornell West

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Happy Centennial Daniel!: So far this month, Edward Curtin has graced his Behind the Curtain blog with two typically brilliant pieces of reporting and analysis. The first is simply a digital reprint of what he wrote the day after the priest Daniel Berrigan died five years ago at 95. Curtin, then 24, met Berrigan, then 47, and over the years kept in touch with the man who changed his life permanently. 

Titled “Walking with Fr. Daniel Berrigan, S.J., a Criminal for Peace,” it is also in Curtin’s Seeking the Truth in a Country of Lies (Clarity Press, 2020). While one can read “Walking,” including readers’ comments, online for free, the book is a keeper. With luck a companion volume will contain readers’ comments on the more than 40 essays in Seeking that people first read as blog entries.

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Philip Who?: Curtin’s other entry so far this month is on how Covid-19 and the pharmaceuticals produced in response have been reported and misreported. “Second Stage Terror Wars” will take some time to get through, particularly if one explores some of the nearly 50 links in it. (Through them readers can enter whole worlds of reality that are brand new to them — sometimes known as “rabbit holes.”)

Noted in “Second Stage” is that Philip Zelikow was named to lead the new nongovernmental Covid Commission Planning Group. He was the Bush-Cheney administration functionary who as 9/11 Commission executive director controlled the crafting of its 2004 report on the September 2001 terrorist attacks (not including the anthrax terrorist attacks of that month) to bury inconvenient truths. Zelikow’s responsibility in this position will be the same, although he may not have the clout or credibility he formerly had.

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‘History Can Be Erased — It Often Has Been’: That was headline in our local paper over an op-ed column by Charles Blow of the New York Times. (Read it HERE in the Chattanooga Times Free Press.) The history he talks about is mostly that of the massacre in 1921 that wiped out a whole section of Tulsa, Oklahoma. White residents aided by National Guard soldiers killed hundreds of blacks  and left thousands homeless. Blow says that when a lawyer tried to teach about it in the late 1940s her students at the University of Tulsa her students “didn’t believe her.”

He then shows why, quoting from his own newspaper: “After the massacre, officials set about erasing it from the city’s historical record. Victims were buried in unmarked graves. Police records vanished. The inflammatory Tulsa Tribune articles were cut out before the newspapers were transferred to microfilm.”

Decades later the scrubbing of Tulsa atrocity records was repeated after the September 2001 terrorist attacks (in the scrubbing of which Zelikow was scrubber-in-chief). The FBI continues to withhold “classified” mountains of 9/11 evidence, presumably because its release would evaporate the mythology clouding the attacks.

Blow cites several examples from American history and continues, “We are horrible transmitters of the truth. We are horrible receptors.”

What about that first person plural pronoun?

He concludes similarly: “We absorb the stories we are told, too often without circumspection, imbuing them with the authority of the tell. So, when authorities tell a lie or diminish something, many people will accept it as told.”

The columnist is writing about Tulsa, but also about 9/11. He and colleagues know full well the government accounts of the September 2001 terrorist attacks are hokum. Higher-ups, though, have decided that facts exposing it as such are not yet “fit to print.” When will they be?

Until they are, not only history but science has been erased.

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Here Are Three Marvin Gaye Songs: “What’s Going On” and “Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)” and “Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler).” Click on each to listen.

They are from the tribute to Gaye, HERE, on NPR’s “Morning Edition” this morning. Fifty years ago today Gaye’s smash hit album “What’s Going On” was released. At least some of the songs expressed his frustration with all manner of things not being reported right if at all.

— Mark Channing Miller

Notes, 5-19-21

Why People Don’t Trust Vaccines: That’s the headline over a guest column by Nina Burleigh in today’s New York Times. (Click on it to read if you subscribe.) Twice in two paragraphs she employs the term “conspiracy theories.”

One reason for “vaccine hesitancy,” the best-selling author writes, “is what I call Cold War bad science.” Burleigh cites “the effects of open-air nuclear weapons tests, mind-control experiments by the C.I.A. on unwitting victims, the secret goings-on at Area 51 in the Nevada desert and the clandestine development of bioweapons at an Army base in Maryland ….”

“For decades,” she points out, “various industries and their handmaidens in politics [denied] scientific facts to maximize unregulated profit-making — the sugar industry’s fight with science over obesity, for example, the tobacco industry’s dismissals of the danger of smoking and the climate change denial movement.”

News organizations delayed coverage. Today, they don’t mention persistent scientific and legal challenges to U.S. government Executive Branch accounts of the 9/11 atrocities.

On the science they are joined by the pillars of academia. It took a team at the University of Alaska Fairbanks College of Engineering and Mines led by professor Leroy Hulsey to conclude after a peer-review examination of nearly five years:

“… fire did not cause the collapse of WTC 7 on 9/11, contrary to the conclusions of NIST [the National Institute of Standards and Technology] and private engineering firms that studied the collapse. …  the collapse of WTC 7 was a global failure involving the near-simultaneous failure of every column in the building.”

That is, controlled demolition leveled the 37-story World Trade Center skyscraper. In the United States only a Fairbanks TV station covered the study’s findings. Elsewhere they weren’t disputed, just ignored.

No wonder so many distrust government and media urgings to social distance, wear masks and get your shots. Burleigh has had hers.

— Mark Channing Miller