Notes, 9-30-21

In no particular order, below are some things worth noting.

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*  I found the link for yesterday’s entry, “Due Diligence,” on the Boston 9/11 Truth website, https://www.boston911truth.org, which is full of interesting stuff. Keep it up over there!

Indira Singh, featured in that entry. is a fascinating character who appears to be enormously capable and remarkably articulate. Among her attributes is her experience as a trained EMT. She used it on site at the World Trade Center for several days after the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Click HERE for the transcript of a long interview recorded on April 27, 2005 (which I haven’t finished reading yet) to see what I mean.

*  I can’t recommend highly enough The Corbett Report, published by James Corbett. From it I picked up the interview excerpted and linked to yesterday. Not that I don’t have differences with Corbett, who in his Episode 020, “Webster Tarpley on the 9/11 Drills,” referred to “the myth of peak oil.” I’m with Richard Heinberg on that subject and since 2006 have considered myself a peak oiler. But people change; that presentation by Tarpley was in 2004 or earlier, and maybe Corbett has seen the light since then.

*  Wikipedia’s entry on Tarpley says he was “born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, in 1946,” something omitted from the short biography of him in the fifth edition of his book 9/11 Synthetic Terror: Made in USA (Progressive Press, 2011). As I listened to Tarpley’s 2004 presentation on the chaos created by the unprecedented number of military drills on and before Sept. 11, 2001, I wished I had a transcript of it. But perhaps it’s contained in Chapter 2 of the book mentioned above; it’s titled “The Theory and Practice of Synthetic Terrorism.” I own a copy of the book but haven’t read through it, but plan to.

* KISS. An axiom in basic journalism as practiced at the local level goes, “Keep it simple, stupid.” Editors teach cub reporters to not confuse readers with a bunch of verbiage and unnecessary details. One editor I have in mind would mark up a story (sometimes with the reporter looking over his shoulder) and “let the air out of it,” improving as he went along and making it more readable. However, the KISS principle seems to have been misapplied by the craven mainstream media in “our democracy” since early 2002 as outlets have wholly adopted, without attribution, the impossible and implausible official Executive Branch accounts of the September 2001 terror attacks — which necessitates forgetting about some of the solid reporting their own reporters did early on. Nine-eleven “truthers” have been widely disparaged in the mainstream media as “conspiracy theorists” even though a lot of their research has relied on MSM reporting done before the reporters who did it seem to have been reined in by news managers and their managers.

— Mark Channing Miller

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